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Author Topic: Simplest Solid State Tesla Switch!  (Read 26918 times)

Offline lanenal

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Simplest Solid State Tesla Switch!
« on: February 10, 2009, 04:07:47 PM »
This circuit should be the easiest to tune as well (Reason: when the pulse is at 6V, all transistors should be open switch, so logically, there will never be battery shorts). The pulse voltage source V5 can be replaced by a 555 astable circuit. V6 can be obtained by using an equal voltage divider (two 5K resisters, for example) sharing the same power as the 555 circuit. All the JBT transistors can be replaced with equiv. MOSFETs. I used voltage dependent current source and a resistor to mimick the behavior of a transformer. You can use 4 transformers instead in your implementation (MOSFETs are probably better than JBTs, I am affraid, as MOSFETs have no gate current). I used no diodes for switching purpose in this circuit. LTspice simulation is performed and the plot of the current over the load R3 is given below (I omitted the two capacitors at each end of the load R3 for the sake of simulation, in your implementation, you should include them).

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy


Offline lanenal

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Re: Simplest Solid State Tesla Switch!
« Reply #1 on: February 11, 2009, 05:38:32 AM »
OK, here is the MOSFET version, LTspice simulation looks similar.


This circuit should be the easiest to tune as well (Reason: when the pulse is at 6V, all transistors should be open switch, so logically, there will never be battery shorts). The pulse voltage source V5 can be replaced by a 555 astable circuit. V6 can be obtained by using an equal voltage divider (two 5K resisters, for example) sharing the same power as the 555 circuit. All the JBT transistors can be replaced with equiv. MOSFETs. I used voltage dependent current source and a resistor to mimick the behavior of a transformer. You can use 4 transformers instead in your implementation (MOSFETs are probably better than JBTs, I am affraid, as MOSFETs have no gate current). I used no diodes for switching purpose in this circuit. LTspice simulation is performed and the plot of the current over the load R3 is given below (I omitted the two capacitors at each end of the load R3 for the sake of simulation, in your implementation, you should include them).

Offline lanenal

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Re: Simplest Solid State Tesla Switch!
« Reply #2 on: February 11, 2009, 06:27:58 AM »
OK, here is the MOSFET version, LTspice simulation looks similar.

Made it more clear in drawing: transformers are explicitly drawn.

Offline lanenal

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Re: Simplest Solid State Tesla Switch!
« Reply #3 on: February 12, 2009, 06:55:54 AM »
Here are better simulation plots and circuit with more detailed plan.

Offline BediniBattery

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Solid State Mosfet Switcher - 24 volt Tesla Switch, 720 Watt 30 Amp
« Reply #4 on: March 19, 2012, 09:35:35 AM »
Circuit Operation For The 6 Battery Tesla Switch - 720 Watt at 30 Amps

The circuit uses 6 lead acid batteries to form the basis of an overunity free energy device.
The output voltage across the load has been set at 24 volts to enable higher power to be dissipated in the load.
Higher power tesla switch circuits can be created, but this will mean that special higher voltage rated components are used.
The maximum amount of power that the circuit can output using 6 batteries is (24 Volts, 30 Amps, 0.8 Ohms) = 720 Watt.

3 batteries are wired in series & 3 batteries are wired in parallel at any one time.
All 3 mosfets are turned on in the first circuit & at the same time 3 mosfets are turned off in the second circuit.

There is no danger of short circuits occuring with the mosfet switching, so very fast switching speeds can be achieved,
with little, if any drop in the output voltage. A continuous supply of DC power can be achieved using this circuit.
The switching frequency is between 100 - 800 Hz, sufficent to obtain free energy from the vacuum & keep all of the batteries fully charged.
A low value super capacitor (6 Farads 40 Volt) can assist with powering the load, whilst the battery switching is being done.

A low power 30 volt dc supply is required to turn on all of the mosfets correctly, this will be done whilst using zener diode gate
protection. The mosfet switching circuit will draw less than 100mA at 12 volts DC.

2 mosfets are used to change the battery wiring configuration from series to parallel.

When the N-Type mosfet gates are low (0 Volts), current can flow in the series circuit.
When the N-Type mosfet gates are high (+12 Volts), the batteries are wired in parallel.

When all of the N-Type mosfet gates are low (0 Volts), no current flows in the load circuit, all of the batteries will be wired in parallel.

The 3 batteries that are wired in series are used in discharge mode.
The 3 batteries that are wired in parallel are used in charge mode.

There are 12 high power schottky diodes which provide the necessary circuit paths for both of the battery circuits.
The peak inverse voltage rating for any of the diodes should be 45 volts or higher.
The current rating for the stud diodes needs to be 60 amps or greater with a suitable heatsink for each component.
The diodes should be wired as close to the battery terminals as is practically possible to minimise all circuit resistance.

2 mosfets provide the necessary isolation between the charge & discharge circuits.
If a fault develops with either of the two load control mosfets, one of batteries will become uncontrollably over charged.
Normally open relays can provide protection against over charging faults with a suitable voltage measuring circuit.

A blinking LED can show whether the mosfet is switching correctly, by placing a small load between the source & 0V.
The switching frequency should be divided by 20 to show a noticable flashing speed.

All of the batteries are intended to provide equal amounts of power to the load & there should be no fault conditions,
however all of the fault conditions should be understood.

If it is important to get as much power as possible from the tesla switch, you may decide not to incorporate any fuses.
There are 30 amp fuses available, but the additional resistance will reduce the output power due to ohms law.
Adding a fuse may not protect the circuit from fault conditions, since it may not blow, so there is a trade off to be made.
When the circuit is functioning correctly - there will be no risk of overheating or damage to the batteries.

If one of the diodes fails, there could be a short circuit across one of the batteries.
This fault condition is unlikely but it is a possibility.

This circuit was designed by Snail at Universally aware dot ning dot com

- http://universallyaware.ning.com/photo/albums/free-energy-overunity-from-lead-acid-batteries -

The circuit diagram only shows one part of the circuit fully, without the astable driver circuit, but you have all the information here to build & test it.
Both circuits work identically so, its not hard to follow or make a pcb.

The mosfets require a low power 30v step up voltage regulator which you can probably build yourself, using a iron dust or ferrite core & a single mosfet switching circuit.

Parallel the mosfets to get high currents & use 15 watt heatsinks for the diodes.

Download the audio & txt files which explains what the tesla switch circuit is doing.

- http://www.mediafire.com/?dls4s0whqt1ka -

This circuit is to help others who are trying to create a modern solid state switching circuit.
It has no short circuit switching issues & virtually no delay between switching the batteries.

This information has not been fully verified practically, but the circuit should function as it has been carefully designed.


Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Solid State Mosfet Switcher - 24 volt Tesla Switch, 720 Watt 30 Amp
« Reply #4 on: March 19, 2012, 09:35:35 AM »
Sponsored links:




Offline BediniBattery

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Completed 6 Battery Solid State Tesla Switch Circuit Diagram
« Reply #5 on: March 21, 2012, 02:50:05 AM »

This is a completed circuit diagram showing all of the necessary components to build a 6 battery tesla switch.

There are 2 sets of 3 batteries which are switched from series to parallel.

The whole circuit is controlled entirely by a single 555 astable timer.

The 555 timer is powered off 12 volts dc, however the output must be increased to 30 volts peak to peak to switch the npn & pnp transistor on & off properly.

The transistors are used to either switch the mosfet gates directly or are being used to invert a signal so that it is the correct way around.

A 30 Volt 100ma Supply is required to switch all of the mosfets correctly using the BC546 & BC557 transistors.


 

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