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Author Topic: HHO Pulse Combustion Turbine by RM :)  (Read 17967 times)

Offline evolvingape

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HHO Pulse Combustion Turbine by RM :)
« on: January 27, 2011, 05:52:32 AM »
Hi Everyone :)

This is the final piece of the puzzle. I have not finished this project and this will become apparent by the time I have written it all up for you.

It is approximately 75% complete. The important bits have been covered but there are still areas of theory that need more work, but mostly it is the off the shelf availability and integration of components that I am not happy with. You guys are going to have to carry the torch and complete this amongst yourselves.

Ok, So lets talk about the Linear Firing Valve :)

I have provided a diagram of the valve you are going to have to make to enable a HHO PCT to become a viable proposition.

During the Priming phase both springs are EXTENDED, opening the HHO inlet, and closing the HHO outlet. This creates an enclosed chamber that builds an energy potential in the form of HHO gas.

When the HHO is combusted the rapidly expanding gas creates expansion forces that act on the flat faces of both valves, COMPRESSING both springs.

So when Priming the two valves move towards each other and the springs extend, when Combusting the two valves move away from each other and the springs compress.

I am perfectly happy with the valve on the left side of the diagram. This is the Energy Conversion Valve, and you may recognise it as an "inversion" of the Nozzle Insert previously documented in the HELTA and HELIS. This is not surprising as the HELIS insert was created by inverting the ECV shown below. The ECV came from the De Laval Nozzle original design and is a simplified cylindrical shape.

I am not happy with the valve on the right side of the diagram. I am unable to draw it how i want too, however it is simply an all metal Non Return Valve or Check Valve.

I DO NOT LIKE standard off the shelf hydraulic NRV's. They will fail due to the "plastic" seal. Should the NRV fail a flashback will blow up your HHO supply. Not a happy thought :(

The part that is coloured RED is all one piece, remember this is a sectional view of a cylindrical valve assembly. I needed to seperate it to show the HHO YELLOW pathways.

The spring pushing the ECV and closing the chamber will need to be strong, rapidly closing the valve after firing and allowing priming pressure to build. The spring pushing the NRV open will need to be weak allowing the expanding gases from combustion to rapidly close the NRV.

I have not included the Ignition Source in the diagram, a Buzz Coil timed from the shaft. It will be mounted at a right angle to the nozzle assembly, through the assembly outer wall, in the center of the combustion chamber. (Where the words priming and combustion appear).

RM :)

« Last Edit: January 27, 2011, 08:47:12 AM by evolvingape »

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Offline evolvingape

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Re: HHO Pulse Combustion Turbine by RM :)
« Reply #1 on: January 28, 2011, 02:38:27 AM »
When operating a turbine system it is important to understand that a turbine is the easiest engine to stall.

The aim of the game is to spin the turbine up to desired RPM without any load being applied. Operating range 5,000 - 20,000 RPM.

DO NOT EXCEED 20,000 RPM MAX OR YOUR GOING TO HAVE A REALLY BAD DAY!

Once the turbine is at desired operating speed unloaded, a load is gradually applied and RPM will reduce. Apply excessive load and you will stall it.

You must gradually increase the load always maintaining the turbine RPM in the range between stall and overspeed.

If you do it correctly the turbine will become self sustaining, with a full load applied, at the same RPM as it was when unloaded. Torque will have increased when loaded but RPM will always remain in the acceptable operating range.

In order to aid this balancing act I have designed my PCT to have very thick heavy discs, we are talking 10mm to 1/2" thick in 316 with highly polished faces.

The reason I have done this is to use the discs in two modes of operation.

The first mode is the transference of energy from the rapidly expanding hot gas to the disc surfaces through the principles of viscosity and adhesion as explained by Tesla.

The second mode is using the mass (thickness) of the discs as a flywheel. Once spun up to speed unloaded the energy will be stored in the large rotating mass of the discs and will act as a buffer to absorb the RPM shed when the load from the PMA is gradually applied.

The other usefull thing about this process is that the mass of the discs will act as a heat sink and the same temperature that would warp a thin disc will not warp a thick disc.

Another point to note is learn to love pulleys. A pulley and a belt is a poor mans miracle. It acts as a 90 degree power take off and also acts as a dry slip friction clutch. Think about it :) The PMA (load) mounted on a slide or hinge controlled by a threaded rod and a wingnut is a beautiful tool, allowing you to control the load, and is also forgiving at the same time.

Have a look at this site:

http://www.phoenixnavigation.com/menu.htm

Some of you will already know about Ken Riely, some of you will not. Join the club, he can tell you more about conventional boundary layer turbines in a second than I would even attempt.

Now, the diagram I have posted below is an experimental HHO PCT System Architecture. The aim of the game is to spin the turbine up to 15,000 - 20,000 RPM and then gradually apply the load.

NOTE: Balance is normally achieved by controlling the fuel intake. I have no idea how you are going to interpret my designs and no idea what the specification of the eventual turbine you build will be.

So, to get around this I have controlled the system by using 4 separate ECV's with controlled firing phases by the buzz coil timing magnets on the turbine main shaft. You can fire 1 or 4 or all of them or any combination to control the energy input to the disc stack. Figure out where your switches need to go.

RM :)



 

Offline evolvingape

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Re: HHO Pulse Combustion Turbine by RM :)
« Reply #2 on: January 29, 2011, 04:01:56 AM »
I am too tired to do the writeup for this right now but I thought I would post the picture for you to ponder.

Hold off on the questions if you have any, they may be explained in the write up.

RM :)

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: HHO Pulse Combustion Turbine by RM :)
« Reply #2 on: January 29, 2011, 04:01:56 AM »
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Offline evolvingape

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Re: HHO Pulse Combustion Turbine by RM :)
« Reply #3 on: January 29, 2011, 06:15:19 PM »
The diagram I posted is an idea I was toying with to reduce the work and skill involved in constructing a PCT. It may or may not work and will need prototyping to find out.

I have posted two images from PNG that show what I want to talk about:

The first image is the flow tube where it joins the ring casing, It needs to be welded in place on the outside of the ring and ground on the inside of the ring. Do a good job here and it will pay off. The tube also needs to be at a perfect 90 degree angle.

The second image is of the groove that Ken suggests you grind in the side plate to accept the pipe housing. You can go with the ring groove if you want too, it is a tried and tested design, however I am offering another idea that may work just as well.

On the diagram of the prototype PCT we can see that I have included an Inner and Outer ring plate, these can be accurately cut by laser or water jet to close tolerances. So instead of removing material to get a groove we are adding it.

The component I have labelled Housing Plate to Inner Ring Bolt is what will join your Ring Plate to the Square Side Housing Plate. Because we will be using very thick sheet for the Inner and Outer Rings they can be drilled and tapped to allow us to join the two together. Make sure you leave enough material to not create an overly thin spot in the bottom of the tapped hole of the Ring Plates.

This process should create a near perfect groove for the Housing Ring Pipe to sit in with reasonably close tolerances.

Some of you may have been wondering what I meant by "Ceramic Paper". Well I was toying with using this as a seal:

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/Ceramic-Fibre-Paper-1-roll-2mm-Kiln-Furnace-Not-Blanket-/120676548196?pt=UK_Crafts_Ceramic_PotteryMaking_SM&hash=item1c18e1fe64

They use this for lining Kilns and it is rated to 1260C. It is 2mm thick and when compressed might plug the gap nicely and force the hot gases to take the path of least resistance.

The hot gas will be exhausted parallel to the shaft and hit the Heat Deflection Rings which are there to protect your bearings and any pulleys mounted the other side of them. They will also provide some stability to the rotor.

I have not been able to locate any off the shelf hubs I would be happy to recommend as the Rotary Load Bearing Bolts need to be quite close to the shaft and also very heavy duty to handle the heavy weight rotating load of the turbine.

The discs after being laser cut will need to be turned on a lathe. The reason for this is that generally a laser does not cut at 90 degrees. It will on average cut at 2 degrees from 90. So in order to properly balance the disc stack the edges of the entire disc stack must be turned together.

I mentioned before that my idea for this turbine is to have very heavy discs that act as heat sinks and flywheels. I consider 6mm for this design a light rotor and 12 mm a heavy rotor. The other important thing about a heavy disc is that the thickness of the disc will help prevent tip stretch. You will know if you are getting tip stretch from your discs by examining the inner surface of the Housing Ring Pipe as it will leave a mark.

The housing Ring Pipe could be a thin section of Schedule 316 Pipe:

http://www.steelexpress.co.uk/non-ferrous/stainless-steel-tube.html#seamless

Now, S80S 8" Seamless 316 Pipe has dimensions of:

OD 8.625" (219.08mm)
ID 7.325" (193.68mm)
Wall 0.5" (12.7mm)

This will give you just over a 7" disc rotor. For this design that is pretty small. I imagine it will work best with an 18" rotor or larger. The larger the rotor the more Torque will be extracted from the Fluid due to the larger time component it is interacting with the disc surface. They do not make Schedule Pipe that big, so, the other alternative may be Hot Finished Seamless Mechanical Mild Steel Tubes:

http://www.steelexpress.co.uk/structuralsteel/hot-finished-seamless-tube.html

This goes out to 660mm OD with wall thickness ranging from 40mm to 100mm. It is only Mild Steel so you are going to have to make a decision on whether you think it is suitable or not.

Alternatively you guys may have some better ideas about where to source a large high tolerance ring in suitable material :)

A point to note about a PCT is that it is a Hot Rotor and as such has no seals to worry about, it does however create a lot of heat. So you are going to have to decide if 316 is suitable or whether your are going to have to go a little more exotic with perhaps a Titanium Stainless Alloy. Titanium is what is used for the reaction blades in conventional gas turbines.

You may find that the low pressure from your bubbler is not providing enough HHO to feed the Linear Firing Valve with sufficient fuel for each cycle. If this is the case then I think it will be possible to pressurise the system with either a Tesla Pump or the Mini Wankel placed on the output of the Dry Cell Bank.

Remember NO ELECTRIC PUMPS!

The Tesla Pump can be custom designed for the job, The Mini Wankel will need all the holes plugging and a custom cover plate and seal made for the exhaust port to attach a fitting too.

For prototyping purposes run the pump from an external motor until you know the speed required for the pressure you need in the fuel supply system. Then if you have any power left from the PCT when Self-Sustaining you will know the gear ratio of the power take off required to run the pump from PCT output shaft.

Your bubbler is going to tell you whether your NRV in the LFV is working properly, you will know this because your bubbler will blow up! It may be possible to improve the design by adding a flashback arrestor between the bubbler and the LFV.

Ken Riely is claiming the new Winglet design has a 30% efficiency increase over the standard Tesla design so this is something you should look into before deciding on how to go about building a PCT. Its not going to be cheap so think three times, measure three times, and buy and build once.

There is a possibility that due to the sheer mass of the disc stack the PCT is not going to be self starting, if this is found to be the case then an external mechanism to spin the unloaded PCT up to operating speed is going to be required.

Hopefully that has covered everything, I wish you all good luck :)

RM :)

Offline evolvingape

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Re: HHO Pulse Combustion Turbine by RM :)
« Reply #4 on: January 30, 2011, 06:52:00 AM »
Hi everyone :)

I was all done with my technology releases...

The HHO PCT was the final project in the sequence...

So I got to reminiscing and was wandering through the trials and tribulations, the successes and the failures, and enjoying recollections of moments of epiphany...

When I thought of this...

A Hot Rotor is by definition Hot... A Hot Rotor Turbine produces HEAT as a waste product.

Now, Those of you who have read my work know by now that I hate to waste energy, I see it as an untapped energy source.

So I got to thinking and my previous experiences and skills learned came into play and I mused upon the diagram below, built with the ECTT.

A Hot Rotor whose "waste gases" are tapped to "power" a Heat Exchanger can produce steam, or they can purify water, or simply heat it.

I have already documented in my work how you can use Schedule Pipe and 316 fittings to make your own radiator or "heat exchanger".

A 6 metre length of pipe is going to cost you about £10 per metre and the fittings a few bob each.

Why not "capture" the "waste" gases from a hot rotor and use it as a power source ?

The added advantage is that you will need to expose as much of the waste hot gas to the heat exchanger as possible and a 6 metre length sent through a "snake", inside a tank of water will transfer the energy nicely...

How much energy that would otherwise be wasted can we reclaim through this process ?

Enough to make a significant improvement in Hot Rotor efficiency even with standard fuels ??

Let me know the answer if you have a Hot Rotor sitting around idle and fancy prototyping this :)

RM :)

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: HHO Pulse Combustion Turbine by RM :)
« Reply #4 on: January 30, 2011, 06:52:00 AM »
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Offline evolvingape

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Re: HHO Pulse Combustion Turbine by RM :)
« Reply #5 on: January 31, 2011, 06:43:01 PM »
Hi everyone,

In an effort to bring PCT technology to those not schooled in its operating principles I pursued the Symmetrical design I have provided details of. I did this to reduce the knowledge of rotor balancing required for SAFE operation of the system.

However, one thing has always bothered me about this design...

Remember previously when I have talked about the differences between Spark Plugs and Glow Plugs, well that is what was bothering me...

A Glow Plug combusts by heating the combustion chamber to a temperature above that required for ignition of the fuel, once operating temperature has been reached the engine continues to run with automatic timing with combustion occurring on each fresh injection of fuel.

Now, the LFV is not designed to run on automatic timing, it is designed to be fired at a precise phase angle of the PCT output shaft using a Spark.

The problem is that Hydrogen burns VERY HOT and you would experience misfires from the valve chamber heating to a point above that required for ignition, acting as automatic timing. This does not create a problem with the "injection of hot gas" into the Rotor as the PCT is a Rotary Engine and will accept energy input at any point in its phase rotation.

The problem comes with getting a "full charge" of HHO into the LFV before the heat ignites it. The NRV would effectively close almost immediately it was opened, giving you only a very small "Pulse".

Following on from what I posted last night I have slept on it and now fully developed my idea for the Heat Exchanger...

Looking at the diagram we can see that I have completely enclosed the LFV, PMA, Hot Rotor and Hot Gas Collection Chamber inside a Tank of Water. This serves TWO purposes.

The first purpose is to "Reclaim" the waste energy exhausted from the Hot Rotor in the form of heat.

The second purpose is the "act of reclaiming the heat" takes it away from the Rotor housing (improving efficiency of heat exchange through increased surface area) and more importantly conducts the heat away from the LFV.

It remains to be seen if this is sufficient to bring the LFV assembly operating temperature down BELOW that which is required for automatic ignition of Hydrogen.

To facilitate this new concept I have returned to the traditional design of a Hot Rotor with a single exhaust. I have put up a picture from PNG to illustrate one of Ken's designs with an enclosed PMA and Hot Rotor in one assembly. (Note the dual pulley on the PMA output shaft exterior to the casing).

To integrate this design of turbine into my Heat Exchanger design it would simply need a Hot Gas Collection Box adding on to the exhaust side of the Rotor housing. The Heat Exchange piping must also have more than one output from the collection box to avoid a dangerous over pressure situation arising from a blockage and also to prevent restriction of the exhaust impairing efficiency of the Rotor. (Unless you want to control the Rotor Back Pressure in this way ;))

Because it will be submerged in a tank of pure water Stainless Steel Hydraulic Fittings are essential to avoid corrosion. This is what I am talking about:

http://buyfittingsonline.gb3.com/Fittings/cat417_1.htm

So in summary by opting for a non-symmetrical design we can enclose all the separate assemblies into one housing that will act as the Heat Exchanger and also "may" solve the potential problem of automatic ignition. The Energy Conversion of Heat into Steam Pressure can also then be used in a number of different ways.

RM:)

Offline evolvingape

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Re: HHO Pulse Combustion Turbine by RM :)
« Reply #6 on: February 09, 2011, 03:37:32 AM »
Hi everyone,

I am updating the LFV sectional view with a new improved version. I was not happy with the original, it conveyed the basic concept but had some unacceptable engineering flaws. I have corrected these in the image posted below.

I consider this to be the final iteration of the highest efficiency LFV. I have designed it so that it only has one moving part and one spring. I have isolated the spring from the HHO inlet and from the combustion process.

The entire valve is assembled by sliding the ECV into place, inserting the custom poppet piston, sliding the NRV housing into place, inserting the spring, screwing in the spring retaining plug and finally screwing on the quick release inlet fitting that locks everything into place (Final operation of quick release attachment not shown).

The LFV Final Version can be built entirely with the following skill sets:

Turning
Drilling
Reaming
Tapping
Threading
Attention to Detail
Tolerance 10 Microns or less

The Custom NRV Poppet is highly important:

It allows free flow of HHO injection under pressure during the priming cycle, it also should act as an expansion pressure / flame speed differentiator. What I mean by this is that the "snake" forces the flame to take the longest linear path, while the pressure of expanding hot gas should close the valve before the flame speed can get through the cone seat.

I have reconsidered my position on off the shelf hydraulic NRV's as long as the following caveats are met:

1) Metal to Metal Cone Seat ONLY
2) Stainless Steel 316 Minimum Specification
3) Taper Male to Taper Female ONLY
4) Parallel Thread with Ceramic Seal ONLY
5) NO PLASTIC SEALING EVER

However, a custom piston must be made to follow the schematic.

RM :)


Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: HHO Pulse Combustion Turbine by RM :)
« Reply #6 on: February 09, 2011, 03:37:32 AM »
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Offline evolvingape

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Re: HHO Pulse Combustion Turbine by RM :)
« Reply #7 on: February 13, 2011, 04:51:09 AM »
Ok...

Some more pieces of the jigsaw are about to fall into place...

You are all probably bored tinkering about with one valve so lets give the system 48 and gain some potential in the process :)

Here are the Phase Angle Locations of a 48 LFV PCT:

Disc Gap 1 has an LFV every 30 Degrees from Top Dead Centre (TDC).

Disc Gap 2 has an LFV every 30 Degrees from TDC with a 15 degree phase angle offset from Disc Gap 1.

Disc Gap 3 has an LFV every 30 Degrees from TDC.

Disc Gap 4 has an LFV every 30 Degrees from TDC with a 15 Degree phase angle offset from Disc Gap 3.

The reason for the phase angle offset is to accommodate the physical diameter of the valve casing. It does not affect in any way the valves performance it is purely a spacial consideration to fit as many valves in workable positions as possible.

Each individual valve must still be positioned so as to inject fluid at a perfect 90 Degree angle to the disc stack. Do not compromise on this parameter, it is critical, reduce the number of valves if you must.

Now, The beauty of a 48 LFV 4 Disc Gap System is in Timing...

When 1 valve is Firing, 11 are Priming. This increases Potential Energy via fuel compression. It also reduces heating of the valve chamber by allowing a large gap between firing pulses, where cooling can occur.

Each individual valve of 12 will fire once per 12 revolutions of the disc stack. 1/12 : Firing/Priming Ratio. If you want a valve to fire every 2 full rotations, or 3 full rotations, or 4 full rotations etc. adjust the reduction pulley ratio accordingly. It is a very flexible timing system.

This is to our advantage, the longer the time between firing, the more cooling can occur and the larger the "charge" that can be potentially stored for detonation.

With each valve being 1/12 the size of a single valve of the same energy potential less heating will occur reducing the possibility of automatic ignition that we all know is bad for a PCT.

One other thing we should talk about is the function of the LFV itself:

An internal combustion engine functions by restricting the expansion pressure of the exploding gases, this converts the pressure into a linear force, and produces a lot of heat in the process.

The LFV converts static pressure to kinetic flow, reducing heat and increasing velocity.

This velocity is utilised by the boundary layer turbine without any compression forces and therefore reduces heat while maximising and utilising energy conversion of the expansion process.

RM :)






« Last Edit: February 13, 2011, 03:10:09 PM by evolvingape »

Offline evolvingape

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Re: HHO Pulse Combustion Turbine by RM :)
« Reply #8 on: February 13, 2011, 05:43:37 AM »
I have amended the original System Architecture to show the Timing System:

If you use a pulley reduction of 1:12 then the driver pulley will rotate 360 degrees in phase with the PCT output shaft. The driven pulley will rotate 1/12 of 360 degrees in this time or 30 degrees.

Pulley reduction ratio driver to driven would be 1:12 for a 12off LFV / Gap System.

A timing magnet at a different radius every 30 Degrees on the Timing Wheel will fire the Buzz Coil for each individual LFV.

Each Disc Gap will have its own Timing Wheel.

1 LFV will fire for each Disc Gap / 360 Degree rotation of the PCT output shaft.

Each LFV / Disc Gap will fire once per 12 complete rotations of the PCT output shaft.

Firing / Priming Ratio 1:12

If you get clever with the wiring you will only need 1off Buzz Coil / Disc Gap and not 1off / LFV.

RM :)
« Last Edit: February 13, 2011, 09:14:24 AM by evolvingape »

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Re: HHO Pulse Combustion Turbine by RM :)
« Reply #8 on: February 13, 2011, 05:43:37 AM »
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Offline evolvingape

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Re: HHO Pulse Combustion Turbine by RM :)
« Reply #9 on: February 13, 2011, 06:35:45 AM »
This is a compromise for the ECV insert for people that do not have the capability of machining one to the proper specification as already documented. This will not perform as well as the one above but will perform.

% efficiency reduction ratio unknown but it will still work!

http://www.drill-service.co.uk/Product.asp?Parent=080520000000&Tool=197

This is the 10 degree taper included angle reamer you need for the expansion phase.

Countersink anything you want they are easy to get in a few different angles for the compression phase.

Have fun :)

RM :)


Offline evolvingape

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Re: HHO Pulse Combustion Turbine by RM :)
« Reply #10 on: February 15, 2011, 04:15:16 AM »
The image below shows the amended detail to the LFV.

The two white circles indicate the area between the piston head and the compression inlet. The green circle indicates the area of maximum compression at the ECV inlet.

The combined white circle area (360 degrees) must exceed the green circle area or you will restrict the flow of fluid into the ECV inlet. This is important because it sets the minimum limit of linear distance that your piston poppet must travel.

Shortest possible linear distance for piston poppet travel is desirable in an LFV because it is a controlled variable of the time component of NRV closure.

The part I have marked 0.001" GAP indicates the rear face of the poppet pressure reaction disc. You can change the gap setting if you want, it will be simple to do turned on a lathe.

The part I have marked Micro Drill shows where to drill through the solid front face of the poppet pressure reaction disc. You can change the angle of drilling to 45 degrees to simplify machining and may even increase the poppet reaction under expansion pressure. The outer edge of the front disc is a semi mechanical seal and must be a very close tolerance (10 microns max) and will slide inside its sleeve very similar to a hydraulic piston.

You may get tempted to change the shape of the poppet piston rounded end to match the ECV inlet. Do not do this under any circumstances. If the metal expands from the heat it could jam in the ECV inlet and the NRV will not close.

If you are building an ECV compromise then you can change the shape of the poppet piston rounded end to a machined cone to match the countersink without worrying about it.

Now lets talk about how many discs your going to choose for your PCT...

2 Discs are the minimum required for a system. This gives us one disc gap for fluid potential injection.

If we increase to 3 Discs then we have two gaps for fluid potential injection. This is an increase of Disc Stack Mass of 50% but an increase of potential energy of 100%.

If we increase to 4 Discs then Mass increases by a further 33.3% and potential energy increases by 50%.

If we increase to 5 Discs then Mass increases by a further 25% and potential energy increases by 33.3%.

We can keep going with this but the differential gap keeps getting smaller. The largest potential difference of the stack we can exploit is the jump between 2 Discs and 3 Discs. For this reason a 3 Disc System should always be chosen over a 2 Disc System.

In a HHO PCT System such as I have suggested with Discs that have a very large Mass component then I see no reason to select a 2 Disc Stack over a 3 Disc Stack, especially considering the timing advantages already discussed concerning multiple valve cooling, and charging.

RM :) 

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: HHO Pulse Combustion Turbine by RM :)
« Reply #10 on: February 15, 2011, 04:15:16 AM »
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Offline evolvingape

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Re: HHO Pulse Combustion Turbine by RM :)
« Reply #11 on: February 16, 2011, 06:18:38 AM »
Linear Firing Valve Cone Compromise

An LFV built entirely with the simple Cone.

Performing Energy Conversion Processes and Sealing at the same time.

This is the ideal LFV version for rapidly building a 24 Valve PCT, with 3 Discs and 2 Fluid Injection Gaps.

Low Pressure natural Gas Expansion from a Bubbler, or High Pressure Injection from a Tesla Pump.

Stainless Steel 316 work hardens easily, we have Heat and an Impact Die on every Firing Pulse.

Therefore we can control the hardening process of the mating Cone Faces by controlling the HHO Charge and Firing Spacing.

Run your LFV's in slowly from Low Pressure Bubbler before High Pressure Injection is wise.

Enjoy playing with your new toy :)

RM :)









Offline evolvingape

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Re: HHO Pulse Combustion Turbine by RM :)
« Reply #12 on: February 17, 2011, 08:18:43 AM »
Hi everyone,

Pulse 1:

An Impulse of Energy at Time 0 acting at 90 Degrees to Potential Difference creating a Turning Moment.

Pulse 2:

An Impulse of Energy at Time 1/4 acting at 90 Degrees in advance of Time 0 Phase Angle.

Pulse 3:

An Impulse of Energy at Time 1/2 acting at 180 Degrees in advance of Time 0 Phase Angle.

Pulse 4:

An Impulse of Energy at Time 3/4 acting at 270 Degrees in advance of Time 0 Phase Angle.

01 WAVE:

Potential Difference Phase Angle Timing Model.

1/4 Impulse Timing Wheel:

Timing Sequence for a 12 Valve / 3 Bank System, Impulse acting at 1/4 Disc Phase Rotation.

Firing Sequence A1:A2:A3:A4:B1:B2:B3:B4:C1:C2:C3:C4

RM :)





 

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