Language: 
To browser these website, it's necessary to store cookies on your computer.
The cookies contain no personal information, they are required for program control.
  the storage of cookies while browsing this website, on Login and Register.

GDPR and DSGVO law

Storing Cookies (See : http://ec.europa.eu/ipg/basics/legal/cookies/index_en.htm ) help us to bring you our services at overunity.com . If you use this website and our services you declare yourself okay with using cookies .More Infos here:
https://overunity.com/5553/privacy-policy/
If you do not agree with storing cookies, please LEAVE this website now. From the 25th of May 2018, every existing user has to accept the GDPR agreement at first login. If a user is unwilling to accept the GDPR, he should email us and request to erase his account. Many thanks for your understanding.
Amazon Warehouse Deals ! Now even more Deep Discounts ! Check out these great prices on slightly used or just opened once only items.I always buy my gadgets via these great Warehouse deals ! Highly recommended ! Many thanks for supporting OverUnity.com this way.

User Menu

Tesla Paper

Free Energy Book

Get paid

Donations

Please Donate for the Forum.
Many thanks.
Regards, Stefan.(Admin)

A-Ads

Powerbox

Smartbox

3D Solar

3D Solar Panels

DC2DC converter

Micro JouleThief

FireMatch

FireMatch

CCKnife

CCKnife

CCTool

CCTool

Magpi Magazine

Magpi Magazine Free Rasberry Pi Magazine

Battery Recondition

Battery Recondition

Arduino

Ultracaps

YT Subscribe

Gravity Machines

Tesla-Ebook

Magnet Secrets

Lindemann Video

Navigation

Products

Products

WaterMotor kit

Statistics

  • *Total Members: 84248
  • *Latest: khniki

  • *Total Posts: 897998
  • *Total Topics: 15836
  • *Online Today: 44
  • *Most Online: 103
(December 19, 2006, 11:27:19 PM)
  • *Users: 5
  • *Guests: 9
  • *Total: 14

Author Topic: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect  (Read 726378 times)

Offline gyulasun

  • without_ads
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4078
Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #1170 on: April 21, 2013, 02:09:50 PM »
...
There is one other type of "bifilar" coil that is often used and confused with Tesla's design. This is the "hairpin" coil. The hairpin configuration uses the same amount of wire but is non-inductive. If you have the time, you might consider winding a third bolt as a hairpin, and repeat the inductance and electromagnet tests with it.
The hairpin winding is just what you did for the Tesla bifilar, but without cutting and splicing the ends.
...

Hi TinselKoala,

Thanks and at a later time I can do the third coil too.  I understand also that such bifilar coil has only a few nanoHenry inductance depending on how precisely the winding is done.  Long time ago I also tested Caduceus coils for inductance but they have a residual inductance in the some microHenry range, flux cancellation is not so precise in them like in bifilar coils.
Gyula

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #1170 on: April 21, 2013, 02:09:50 PM »

Offline ALVARO_CS

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 178
Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #1171 on: April 21, 2013, 02:11:48 PM »
hi Hoptoad
Are those "totallydamped" pages yours ?
If yes, Ill like your opinion about the possible damage of transistor (MileHigh states)
in the circuit I posted earlier (No 19)
thanks
cheers

Offline Farmhand

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1583
Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #1172 on: April 21, 2013, 03:02:44 PM »
Hi guy's started a thread here -- http://www.overunity.com/13460/teslas-coil-for-electro-magnets/new/#new  .

I'll be posting some results there soon, feel free to join in.

Cheers

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #1172 on: April 21, 2013, 03:02:44 PM »
Sponsored links:




Offline synchro1

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4527
Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #1173 on: April 21, 2013, 03:27:58 PM »
Thank you Gyula. The original experiment involved  shorting both coils accross a "D" cell battery. The obvious difference between the experiments is that power is free to rise to load with the battery, unlike Gyula's latest try, where the power is governd. Maybe the bifilar electromagnet will draw more input then Gyula's inputing to it, if you feed it. The original experiment allows for increased current consumption compared to Gyula's generous attempt. Enlighting regardless!
 
I find it hard to believe "Tesla-Coil-builder" would set out to decieve anyone judging from his polished website. It remains important that any erroneous experiment be exposed as fake.
 
A monopole of increased strength appears in the center of my "SB Spiral Coil". A window coil of single wrap, a large loop of wire with a large space in the center, generates two poles. The serial bifilar displays a dramatic difference in this Spiral configuration as a pulse motor coil. This is where I can independently demonstrate doubling of "Magnetic Field" strength. A monople of doubled strength is formed in the center of the coil. This model broke all the speed records. The red plastic wheels allow the axel and spinner to rotate inside the wooden cup.

Offline MileHigh

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7600
Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #1174 on: April 21, 2013, 03:57:54 PM »
Synchro1:

Gyula's second experiment was done properly.  The regular and the SB coil have the same wire and the same number of turns so the resistance will be the same.  Therefore the current draw will be the same.  In fact, that's just secondary logic.  You know that the basis for making the comparison between the two coils is that you feed both of them the same current level and see what happens.  That's the primary logic.

Here is a thought experiment:  You have an ideal voltage source power supply connected to the nail and the wrapped wire, just like the original setup from the web page experiment link.  The wire is a special imaginary wire where we can define any resistance for the wire.

If we set the voltage source to one volt, and the wire resistance to one ohm we get one amp of current flow.  If we set the wire resistance to 0.001 ohms we get 1000 amps of current flow.

So that's a meaningless experiment.  The strength of the electromagnet has nothing to do with any potential differences in resistive load of the wire wrapped around the coil.  It has to do with the current flowing through the wire.  That's a concept that all must understand.  A magnetic field is created by current flow alone, it has nothing to do with voltage and it has nothing to do with the resistance of the wire or the amount of resistive electrical load the setup puts on the battery.

MileHigh

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #1174 on: April 21, 2013, 03:57:54 PM »
Sponsored links:




Offline Magluvin

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5880
Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #1175 on: April 21, 2013, 05:19:53 PM »
"@all


Hi , i know that one i used to have a pdf copy of a old book called AC electromagnet , and it could pick up any thing plastic you name it .

I will see it i could find it again i tried before without succes.

Mark

I believe I have read that old book in the public library from my home town in PA. Do you remember if it used multiple windings and copper washers? It wasnt just a winding it on a core thing. It could pick up pennys, dimes, etc. I dont remember plastics.

My mom used to like bingo  here n there, and some of the players used dimes or pennys to cover the numbers on the cards, and they had a hand held plastic box like the sizs if a medium cell phone or cigarette pack and swipe it over the cards to pick up the coins for the next round.

In electronics class back in the days, the teacher discussed what metals a magnet or electromagnets could pick up. I told him of that and he disagreed. I brought in the old book and that was the point where, everyone in the class took my crazy ideas more seriously. Before I brought the book in they thought I was nuts. :o :o ;D

If you can find that, I would really appreciate that.  ;)

Thanks

Mags

Offline conradelektro

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1832
Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #1176 on: April 21, 2013, 05:23:46 PM »
Hi Folks,

Single wire coil test        Bifilar wire coil test

first lift     11 nuts                   12 nuts
second lift  8 nuts                     9 nuts
third lift    13 nuts                    11 nuts
fourth lift    9 nuts                    10 nuts
fifth lift        9 nuts                     8 nuts

This shows the performance of the two electromagnets practically the same.

Gyula

I wish we saw more such straight forward and useful tests.

Thank you Gyula, after pages of waffle, finally something tangible.

Conrad

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #1176 on: April 21, 2013, 05:23:46 PM »
Sponsored links:




Offline Magluvin

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5880
Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #1177 on: April 21, 2013, 05:39:39 PM »
Thank you Gyula. The original experiment involved  shorting both coils accross a "D" cell battery. The obvious difference between the experiments is that power is free to rise to load with the battery, unlike Gyula's latest try, where the power is governd. Maybe the bifilar electromagnet will draw more input then Gyula's inputing to it, if you feed it. The original experiment allows for increased current consumption compared to Gyula's generous attempt. Enlighting regardless!

That makes sense. If the supply limits current then its possible that the low ohms of the 2 coils could push those current limits on their own, possibly not letting the currents needed bi the bifi to occur. Dunno yet.  But will.  ;)

Mags

Offline gyulasun

  • without_ads
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4078
Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #1178 on: April 21, 2013, 07:32:17 PM »
"@all


Hi , i know that one i used to have a pdf copy of a old book called AC electromagnet , and it could pick up any thing plastic you name it .

I will see it i could find it again i tried before without succes.

Mark

Hi,

I also remember this book. However, conduction is a key factor for the principle shown in it so metals (even if they are non-ferrouos) able to conduct electric current can be involved. The principle is inducing eddy current in a metal piece by the changing AC field.
Here is a link to the PDF file:  http://www.themeasuringsystemofthegods.com/Non-ferrous%20metals.pdf

Gyula

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #1178 on: April 21, 2013, 07:32:17 PM »
3D Solar Panels

Offline Magluvin

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5880
Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #1179 on: April 21, 2013, 09:26:33 PM »
Hi,

I also remember this book. However, conduction is a key factor for the principle shown in it so metals (even if they are non-ferrouos) able to conduct electric current can be involved. The principle is inducing eddy current in a metal piece by the changing AC field.
Here is a link to the PDF file:  http://www.themeasuringsystemofthegods.com/Non-ferrous%20metals.pdf

Gyula

Great pdf. Thanks. ;D

But the book I read was a book of electronic(or electric) experiment projects. I dont remember if it was older than 1952. But it was just one of the projects it presented. But this one you have shown, gives a lot of info to where one could learn a lot in one sitting.  ;) Good one.

Mags

Offline Mk1

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2068
Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #1180 on: April 21, 2013, 10:10:00 PM »
@all

I have found this ... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v8TbqZa8li4   atracting a stone with a coil.

I also made a coil a while back that did not show load on the circuit , https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w54lxNS3Hus&list=UULKKCauubuWLRdng24R-cKQ&index=4

Its a simple joule thief with a pickup coil , a led on the output of the coil and on the joule thief , usually doing so dims the light output of both led , but not in this case because the led is connected backwards.

Mark

Free Energy | searching for free energy and discussing free energy

Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #1180 on: April 21, 2013, 10:10:00 PM »
3D Solar Panels

Offline conradelektro

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1832
Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #1181 on: April 21, 2013, 10:48:15 PM »
Sorry to distract from the magnetisation and coil topic.

I could design a commutating circuit with one hall sensor, two P-Channel and two N-Channel MOSFETS (some sort of transistor H-Bridge).

See the attached circuit, scope shots and photo. The scope shots are over the drive coil. Looks like some very clean switching (commutation) of the drive coil.

The results of a first test:

12 Volt, 17 mA, 70 Hz (0.2 Watt, 4200 rpm)

20 Volt, 25 mA, 140 Hz (0.5 Watt, 8400 rpm)

I still have a mechanical problem, the plastic axle is not straight (causes vibrations). I will make a brass axle which should be better.

This seems to be a low power drive circuit to produce considerable spin. One can now try to find some "Lenz free coils" which produce more than 0.2 Watt or 0.5 Watt from the 4200 rpm or 8400 rpm.

May be people who build similar set ups can publish their power requirements for their spinners?

Greetings, Conrad

Offline conradelektro

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1832
Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #1182 on: April 21, 2013, 11:30:47 PM »
Other MOSFETS:

I switched to the AUIRF9Z34N (P-Channel) and the AUIRFZ34N (N-Channel) because they have less resistance when switched on. This produces a little bit higher rpm value (about 10%) for the same power input. Theire 55 V Drain to Source braekdown Voltage is high enough because the drive coil is switched (commutated) cleanly, only small spikes.

Greetings, Conrad

Offline hoptoad

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1009
Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #1183 on: April 22, 2013, 03:59:59 AM »
hi Hoptoad
Are those "totallydamped" pages yours ?
If yes, Ill like your opinion about the possible damage of transistor (MileHigh states)
in the circuit I posted earlier (No 19)
thanks
cheers

Yep, those are my pages. If following figure number 19, with one coil winding connected back to the supply via a diode (in feedback mode), the cemf spike will be damped by the battery and should alleviate any potential harm to the transistor. If the circuit is not using one winding as feedback, or there is not even a diode straight across the driving coil winding, there is a possibility of transistor damage if you are using high impedance coils or supply voltages greater than 12 volts. However, if you have connected the windings as shown in fig 19 then there is no real threat of potential transistor damage.

Cheers

Offline MileHigh

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7600
Re: Confirming the Delayed Lenz Effect
« Reply #1184 on: April 22, 2013, 04:22:10 AM »
Hoptoad:

Sorry but I am going to correct you.

In figure 19 when the transistor is on the current from the battery flows through bi-filar winding A only.

When the transistor is switched off the bi-filar winding A becomes the power source and it has to discharge its stored energy.  The "load" in this case is the switched-off transistor, bi-filar winding B, and D1, and this is in parallel with the battery.

[I am editing here to add the battery to the discussion when the bi-filar coil A discharges.]

Note the current can also flow through the switched-off transistor and through the battery.  So when the bi-filar winding A is discharging the current can take two paths.

So the load is the switched-off transistor, the bi-filar winding B, and D1 and the battery.   So that's three components in series in parallel with the battery, which is a fourth component.  The vast majority of the power dissipated in the load will go into the component that has the highest resistance.

The component with the highest resistance is the switched-off transistor.  So when the transistor switches off, it instantly gets whacked with almost all of the energy that is stored in bi-filar winding A.

MileHigh

 

OneLink