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Author Topic: Perpetual solar self sustainer.  (Read 19319 times)

stevensrd1

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Perpetual solar self sustainer.
« on: November 11, 2011, 10:36:14 PM »
A vid on my perpetual solar self sustainer, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i5K11dCgulY

Cherryman

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Re: Perpetual solar self sustainer.
« Reply #1 on: November 11, 2011, 10:46:57 PM »
Looks promising!

Try adding some reflective stuff in the box walls and ceiling perhaps?


powercat

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Re: Perpetual solar self sustainer.
« Reply #2 on: November 12, 2011, 12:08:23 AM »
Great work,
and great title (potential) I wish more people would use that kind of title.
I have seen this type of setup a few times and I think it has a real future especially when you consider the advances being made in solar technology and lighting, with all the work on  drive circuits going on it may not be that long for a true self-runner.

A box made out of mirrors, or line your box with aluminium foil might well help.
I have also seen solar cells with lots of little magnifying glasses on them.
maybe if you made the whole box out of solar cells and then suspended the light in the middle.

only a few ideas,
I wish you all the best  ;)



stevensrd1

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Re: There is another way as well.
« Reply #3 on: November 12, 2011, 09:35:22 PM »
You can just send the power from the solar cells into another separate battery and recharge it. Then when it is recharged just swap it with the main battery powering the setup. Or keep it going or recharge others.

powercat

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Re: Perpetual solar self sustainer.
« Reply #4 on: November 12, 2011, 10:10:47 PM »
That kind of statement reminds me of the Bendini arguments that went on for years about batteries  ::)
needless to say we are not running our homes on Bendini motors,very good research it was though

I think it would be much better if you could use a capacitor, too many of us have seen claims of OU Using batteries that turned out not to be.

And as for measuring batteries, that goes into thousands of pages from what I have seen over the years. and still the arguments will go on.

I'm not trying to put you off, I really like what you're trying to do but if you can try it with out batteries.

All the best


the_big_m_in_ok

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Re: Perpetual solar self sustainer.
« Reply #5 on: November 13, 2011, 01:26:30 AM »
That kind of statement reminds me of the Bendini arguments that went on for years about batteries  ::)
needless to say we are not running our homes on Bendini motors,very good research it was though
Could I pose another concern similar to powercat's, from the point using a different tack to approach the issue of possible system inefficiency?
Thus,
If you take a look at this...  http://www.overunityresearch.com/index.php?PHPSESSID=a68b28b7563b359483d946bc7d4486f2&topic=1002.0
...I started a thread to maintain that the components of an invented system that does the same thing as yours has efficiencies low enough to prevent a 'return on investment' in terms of cost for the system.

Here's an example:  An LED light bulb can put out the same light as a 40W incandescent bulb, while using, say, 13W of power.   Typical performance for LED's.   Radio Shack solar modules put out 6 VDC at around 50 mA in full, noonday sunlight.   See:  http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2131051

If one wishes an to produce an industry-standard 100 net Watts from a fairly large system as a replacement for a 100W solar panel, as designed in a way you appear to have described, it'll be 13W + 100W net = 113W to recharge the batterie(s) and allow an extra 100W output.   113W total.

One module gives  6VDC @ 50mA, for .3 of a Watt.  113/.3 = a little over 377.  That's in series for 6VDC.   5 NiCd batteries can be wired in Radio Shack holders for 6VDC.  But, if a solar module costs about $15 American, that's around $5,700, especially with tax added.   The batteries and light-proof enclosure are more still.   (I could look up the electrical efficiencies of LED's, solar cell types and battery charge rates over time for different types of batteries, but I need more time than I have on this computer.)

I assert the efficiency of the whole system I've experimented on a small scale with, has shone the output to be slightly less from one actual incandescent bulb(about 5VDC), than in the noonday sun on a cloudless day in San Francisco.

I honestly don't want to dampen your enthusiasm any more than than powercat does.  I merely post what I've done in what I say is experimentally and mathematically different than your test results show.
        I'm not allowed to look at YouTube from this restricted computer, but I can go to another computer room next week and see your video for myself on another computer.   I'll try and be be fair to both of us---me especially---and say that I may be missing something without the experience of your precise video test results in particular to go by.   I'll postpone my final opinion after I see your video.

I freely admit I can be wrong like anyone else.   Just my opinion worth 2 cents.

--Lee

powercat

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Re: Perpetual solar self sustainer.
« Reply #6 on: November 15, 2011, 05:05:28 PM »
        I'm not allowed to look at YouTube from this restricted computer, but I can go to another computer room next week and see your video for myself on another computer.

@Lee
 8)Are you working in a top security facility or something like that ?

@stevensrd1
Any news or thoughts ?


the_big_m_in_ok

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Re: Perpetual solar self sustainer.
« Reply #7 on: November 15, 2011, 10:41:40 PM »
@Lee
 8)Are you working in a top security facility or something like that?
Not yet.   I might get into electronic engineering in the future, since I did it in the early 80's for then-current technology as R&D.   I'm familiarizing myself with basic concepts now, with possibly some increased interest high voltage in a few years.   Simple work for now and on my own.

With a healthy! respect for AC line voltage and current levels!!

--Lee

the_big_m_in_ok

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Re: Perpetual solar self sustainer.
« Reply #8 on: November 15, 2011, 11:02:50 PM »
A vid on my perpetual solar self sustainer, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i5K11dCgulY
Hi Steven...
Could you upload a schematic on the setup you have?   For myself, I have only one place I can view "YouTube" videos for any reasonable time period with reliable computers.   I'll go through the video again to try and figure out  exactly how your device works, but I think I know the basic premise behind it.

--Lee

powercat

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Re: Perpetual solar self sustainer.
« Reply #9 on: November 15, 2011, 11:05:56 PM »
Funy you should mention  high voltage, I was looking at lighting today,
trying to find the most amount of light for the least amount of power,
what do you think about these HID lamps ?

High-intensity discharge lamps (HID lamps)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High-intensity_discharge_lamp

relatively cheap If purchased at a car accessory store  :)

the_big_m_in_ok

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Re: Perpetual solar self sustainer.
« Reply #10 on: November 15, 2011, 11:41:42 PM »
Funy you should mention  high voltage, I was looking at lighting today,
trying to find the most amount of light for the least amount of power,
what do you think about these HID lamps ?

High-intensity discharge lamps (HID lamps)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High-intensity_discharge_lamp

relatively cheap If purchased at a car accessory store  :)
Right, very unusual.   CFL's and fluorescent tubes have been my speed until now.   I never saw the high powered IMAX movie projector bulb until that Wikipedia article.   It's a simple thing to look at, but seeing it gives me the feeling brute electrical force is needed to ignite an arc in it.   15,000 Watts?   Power transformers outside movie theaters often weigh several tons.   Now I see why.

In terms of power as a BEMF/CEMF capture scheme, I was thinking of three xenon tubes with all three of the 4,000V igniter electrodes in series to make an inexpensive spark gap.   Then put the whole thing in a grounded steel can of some kind to prevent EMI from escaping.   I'll think about a schematic later.

That's the sort of thing I think of in my off moments by myself.
Oh, powercat, I didn't understand at first:   My "restricted computer" was only being filtered for content at the Salvation Army for children using them daily and against explicit sites, of course.   They're a religion, you know.    But that was all.
        I still will do as I said in my previous post, however.

--Lee

powercat

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Re: Perpetual solar self sustainer.
« Reply #11 on: November 16, 2011, 02:45:41 PM »
Nice one Lee, I look forward to that big bang  spark gap  ;D
Here's a bit of cut and paste research I've been doing ;)

HID headlamp burners produce between 2,800 and 3,500 lumens from between 35 and 38 watts of electrical power.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xenon_HID_headlamp#HID_.28xenon.29_light_source.

Calculating actual solar panel output?
Quote
The best I have seen it 50 to 80 percent of the rating of a panel.
Quote
When I was testing my system earlier, I estimated that I got about 1/10 the power generation on a cloudy day as I would get on a sunny day
http://www.fieldlines.com/board/index.php/topic,135582.html


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lux

stevensrd1

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Re: Perpetual solar self sustainer.
« Reply #12 on: November 16, 2011, 09:54:36 PM »
Well I may not fully understand how it works,,but it does, and works just as good at recharging another battery separately but takes days. Better yet check out my overunity pulse charger,,runs on two bats and charges two bats in 24 hours,,sometimes longer but all things considered is pretty neat, here is the link http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nZsSZt2PWMg

the_big_m_in_ok

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Re: Perpetual solar self sustainer.
« Reply #13 on: November 17, 2011, 12:18:30 AM »
A vid on my perpetual solar self sustainer, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i5K11dCgulY
Thanks for the video, stevens...
You're plenty right in proving what you're showing and doing, and indeed the video above does show the LED charging 4ea. solar panels, wired in series, to a
power-stabilized standstill.   Power input = output.   I was going to ask for a schematic at first, but the concept is simple enough to understand by itself.

Since you have such a simple setup, have you thought of more modules for more power for an actual positive charging effect over time---up to the limit of the Joule Thief's input parameters?   You can use the extra power for something else.

Better yet, more LED's for strongly illuminating the modules, and getting a positive charging effect that way?


Using either LED's or fluorescent tubes/bulbs are definitely the way to go.  They use 1/3 the power of a incandescent bulb for proportional light production.

--Lee

stevensrd1

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Re: Perpetual solar self sustainer.
« Reply #14 on: November 17, 2011, 01:47:00 AM »
ive used different types of joule thief circuits,,usually from solar yard lights,,few i have made. And I have used different solar panels, wired different ways. I find the small solar cells work best and wired in series, but I have not tried that many really considering all that is out there. I have found ways to lower the drain by using a resistor after the coil and then using a diode before the actual led to name a few of the ways I have did this. I find it lowers the light output but only barely, which causes less battery drain but the solar cells can still produce enough to go back into  itself,,its very tricky to say the least as the led and solar cells must be so close like two inches apart and it must be positioned just right over the cells for maximum output. At the moment i have rewired it a bit and have it charging a separate battery instead of itself,,slow process of course but works as well. A better way or using two batteries to run a motor and at the same time can recharge two other batteries can be found here, another video under my youtube name. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nZsSZt2PWMg