Language: 
To browser these website, it's necessary to store cookies on your computer.
The cookies contain no personal information, they are required for program control.
  the storage of cookies while browsing this website, on Login and Register.

GDPR and DSGVO law

Storing Cookies (See : http://ec.europa.eu/ipg/basics/legal/cookies/index_en.htm ) help us to bring you our services at overunity.com . If you use this website and our services you declare yourself okay with using cookies .More Infos here:
https://overunity.com/5553/privacy-policy/
If you do not agree with storing cookies, please LEAVE this website now. From the 25th of May 2018, every existing user has to accept the GDPR agreement at first login. If a user is unwilling to accept the GDPR, he should email us and request to erase his account. Many thanks for your understanding

User Menu

Google Search

Custom Search

Author Topic: New comer needs any and all help  (Read 83692 times)

Offline TinselKoala

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13968
Re: New comer needs any and all help
« Reply #135 on: October 27, 2012, 11:05:29 AM »
Wow u been doin a lot of work lately. I've been trying to play with the jt lately. I want to make one I can hook up to 12v or 9v and get a really high amp draw from.. I have seen many diagrams but can't seem to replacte them. I've seen some on u tube powering big Flo light bulbs. That's really what I wanna try to do they all seem to have three winds. I just can't get it. I've got several toroids wound already some with small gauge few turns and big gauge lots of turns and many other variations. Do u know anything bout that? U help a lot on the motor maybe u can with helping me make a high powered jet. Could I hook a transformer to the out put of the jt? Or what could I do. How can I do this..
Sure, I've been playing around with JTs too. My goal has been high voltage, though. I've not been able to light the CFLs the way some folks have but I'm getting quite good results anyway. I've got a little unit here on my desk, like an executive toy, that lights a NE-2 neon with a "dead" AA battery. Some of my JTs will light a CFL fairly brightly.... but not with both wires connected! Only if I have just a single wire connected to the CFL. It's a matter of resonant frequencies and voltage rise by standing wave resonance, and I haven't hit that critical point yet in my constructions. I've run out of cores!

The thicker wire should usually be used for the "primary" and the thinner wire, more turns, for the "secondary", in a step-up transformer like the JT. Another winding for another secondary or a trigger winding can also be put in there. Winding toroids is fun, I hope you figured out how to use a long skinny "bobbin" that you prewind with wire, to thread thru the toroid hole while winding.

JTs work by taking a low voltage, low current source and "compressing" the energy from that into high voltage, high current but _very short_ pulses, separated by lots of blank, off-time. This happens so fast that it looks like continuous power but it's not.

What I've done is to use a diode/capacitor to extract and store the power from JTs, by catching and adding up all the short pulses it emits.

Why don't you show me the schematic of the JT you are trying to build, and let me know exactly what you've done, and I'll see if I can help you get it working. Right now I'm using a JT powered by 5 volts to run two neon ring oscillators, just as a display item.

The one below uses a little inductor I ripped out of an old TV chassis, without modification. The nine-turn outer winding that you can see is used as the primary.

ETA: Don't forget the trick of reversing the hookup of _one_ of the coils to try to get it working.

Offline jhsmith87

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 82
Re: New comer needs any and all help
« Reply #136 on: October 30, 2012, 01:30:04 AM »
I've used many different plans. I can make one work. I just wanna beef one up any one really. Now u say the primary should be the bigger less turns. The primary goes to where the + battery post and where else.
I have a toroid wound with three wires 18g about 10 turns 23g about 50 turns and 30g about 150 turns.

Offline TinselKoala

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13968
Re: New comer needs any and all help
« Reply #137 on: October 31, 2012, 12:38:29 AM »
Well, I don't know about three windings. I'd try using the shorter two in a basic JT circuit and then see if you get higher voltages from the longest winding while it's running on the other two.

You could try this circuit; it's the one from the handheld NE-2 running on a AA battery.

I've just pulled a nice little inductor, 10 mH, from an old TV circuit board, it must have at least 300 turns on a nice ferrite bobbin, and I wound another 30 turns of heavier wire on top of it. Will be testing it out shortly.

I'm no JT expert though. The guys in the other thread are way beyond me as far as getting high power outputs, it seems. But they are using more expensive coil cores than I am willing to buy.

Offline TinselKoala

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13968
Re: New comer needs any and all help
« Reply #138 on: October 31, 2012, 07:25:57 PM »
So.... here's that 10 mH inductor from the TV set. I wound about 30 turns of #22 on the outside of it, over a layer of cloth tape, then used the above schematic, with a 330R resistor in the base leg, to make the newest JT. It blew out a white LED immediately, and lights the NE-2 neon/diode load quite well on a battery that's down to 1.0 volts. I haven't yet tried any other variations with it, but it sure works well lighting the NE-2. Batteries that will not light my other NE2 JTs will light this one. With a fresh AAA it is really bright.

Offline TinselKoala

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13968
Re: New comer needs any and all help
« Reply #139 on: November 01, 2012, 08:10:03 PM »
OK, I think I just figured out that you want high current draw and lots of output power, not necessarily low voltage operation.

OK....we can do that too. For this application you can cheat a little bit by using a secondary that is already wound for you: a TV flyback transformer. You wind your own primary around the exposed part of the ferrite loop that makes the core of the flyback. Then you drive your new primary with the output of a higher-power self-resonating circuit.

Here's the so-called "ZVS" or zero-voltage-switching flyback driver system that I use. It's also similar to the Royer-oscillator-type wireless power and inductive heater circuits.

With the arrangement I'm using it draws about 7 to 9 amps from a 24-36 volt battery supply, and makes 30,000 volts at the flyback output. SO be careful.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4XRwlNCF1PU

Offline jhsmith87

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 82
Re: New comer needs any and all help
« Reply #140 on: November 14, 2012, 06:58:34 PM »
great video, and explanations. i do have an old tv set i took apart, but not sure what parts your talking about and how to use them to do what... sorry but i am a completely ignorant to alot of this stuff.

sorry it has taken me so long to get back for some reason i stopped getting emails when i had a reply. dont know what the deal is.

but basically if i am right base on what your saying, i can not get any more power, voltage or amps from just more windings right? and as far as you know adding a third winding dont do anything as far as more power either? and i can just wrap a 3rd wire around it and get power from the two ends right? they must be hooked to something correct?

as i said i have an old tv and many parts. i would love to make what you made with some power like that. but i would need alot more than the diagram.

Offline TinselKoala

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13968
Re: New comer needs any and all help
« Reply #141 on: November 14, 2012, 10:48:45 PM »
great video, and explanations. i do have an old tv set i took apart, but not sure what parts your talking about and how to use them to do what... sorry but i am a completely ignorant to alot of this stuff.
Well, for the high voltage above all you need from the TV is the flyback transformer. It's the scary looking thing that has a heavy wire going to a suction cup on the picture tube. Be sure your caps are discharged! Look on the internet for some basic info about flyback transformers. You'll just wind an 8 turn primary, with a center tap, on the "handle" of the flyback, and use what is already there for the secondary. The rest of the stuff in the diagram you can get from just about any electronics supply store except Radio Shack.
Quote
sorry it has taken me so long to get back for some reason i stopped getting emails when i had a reply. dont know what the deal is.
No problem, I think some of the software settings in the forum have been changed. Just go into your account settings and re-select email notifications, if that's what you want.
Quote
but basically if i am right base on what your saying, i can not get any more power, voltage or amps from just more windings right? and as far as you know adding a third winding dont do anything as far as more power either? and i can just wrap a 3rd wire around it and get power from the two ends right? they must be hooked to something correct?

Not quite. I believe that you aren't going to get any more _energy_ out than in, or _average_ power, but you can certainly get more volts, or more amps, or more instantaneous power, as the video above shows. It's a matter of the ratio of turns in each of your windings, plus taking advantage of what is called "voltage rise by standing wave resonance". It's great fun, too.
Quote
as i said i have an old tv and many parts. i would love to make what you made with some power like that. but i would need alot more than the diagram.
Lots of people have videos on YouTube fooling around with TV flyback transformers and car ignition coils. You'll see circuits very much like the Bedini motor with a 2n3055 driving the primary, you'll see oscillators based on the 555 chip, and many other variants. This one, based on Royer oscillator induction heaters, is the best and most reliable I've seen. I have not yet blown a single mosfet using this circuit or the inductive wireless power transfer system variant, except once when I mistakenly switched on with no load attached at the output.
You can watch those YT videos and learn a lot. Just be careful, these things really can kill you if you take the output shock across your chest.

Offline jhsmith87

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 82
Re: New comer needs any and all help
« Reply #142 on: November 16, 2012, 11:59:26 PM »
i really like the idea of that last plan you gave me. it seems like just what i am looking for. although i am confused by it, i have no idea how to follow those plans or even what alot of the parts are, i see the capacitor, and resistors, power input and coils, but other than that i am LOST!

Offline TinselKoala

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13968
Re: New comer needs any and all help
« Reply #143 on: November 17, 2012, 12:50:21 AM »
i really like the idea of that last plan you gave me. it seems like just what i am looking for. although i am confused by it, i have no idea how to follow those plans or even what alot of the parts are, i see the capacitor, and resistors, power input and coils, but other than that i am LOST!
Well, other than the parts you mentioned, there are two mosfets (transistor types, the Q1 and Q2), two regular highspeed highvoltage rectifier diodes, and two Zener diodes (the ones right next to the transistors are actually inside them, not separate parts, so don't worry about those). Add a switch, a fuse, and heatsinks for the mosfets. I also used screw terminal blocks to connect the mosfet legs, but you can just solder them in place and save two dollars.
About ten or twelve dollars worth of parts all together. The mosfets are common types, as are the rest of the parts. The hardest part of this circuit is finding the right secondary ground pin on the flyback transformer!

I'll post some pics of the layout of my driver board in a little while, check back in a couple of hours. It should make sense to you when you see the actual parts laid out on a board.

ETA: Don't forget, with the flyback transformer hooked in and working, this circuit can KILL you, or your cat or your child..... so please, be very careful, don't have scattered clipleads all over the place, and know where your cats and children are when you are experimenting. If Tabby jumps up on your bench to check out the sounds or something ... you might get a fried cat for your trouble!

Offline jhsmith87

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 82
Re: New comer needs any and all help
« Reply #144 on: November 17, 2012, 12:56:43 AM »
well i dont have a mosfet or even know what it is. i am just going to try a traditional JT with a big toroid the plans you posted a few post back, and 10t 18g primary and 100t 26g pickup. i am really just trying to provide enough power to light up a light bulb, would be nice for a small appliance. so im am in the process of building what you posted that powered your neons but with a different number of turns and different gauge, also i prolly will use 9v instead of the traditional AA. what do you think?

also how do i know what transistor to use, and if i use one that works how can i know that is the best one to use?

Offline TinselKoala

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13968
Re: New comer needs any and all help
« Reply #145 on: November 17, 2012, 01:06:01 AM »
Well, you need to be careful about the input voltage because you can blow your transistor; Just like in the case of the Bedini motor, the base resistor will determine the current, and will have to be changed to suit your input voltage and your transistor model.

For the circuits we've been looking at, you need a NPN transistor, same as with the Bedini motor. 2n3055 for the powerful ones, 2n2222a or 2n3904 type for the low powered versions. Experiment!

The mosfets for the jacob's ladder flyback driver are specific, you must use IRFP260N, I get them for about $2.50 at my local supplier.( I think they must be used in high-power auto stereo systems or something, or why else would he actually keep them in stock?) Don't try to alter component specs or values in that circuit, until you have more experience, please. Other mosfets can be used but they must have very low "Rdss"... on-state resistance .... so just use the ones I specified.

But for low power JTs ... try any NPN type. First get your basic circuit working with 2n2222a, then sub in transistors you want to play with. Hook them up backwards, every which way, to see what happens. With a 1.5 or 3 volt JT you won't hurt your transistors by hooking them up wrong, I think, but with 9V you might.

Offline jhsmith87

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 82
Re: New comer needs any and all help
« Reply #146 on: November 17, 2012, 01:17:11 AM »
im using  the 2n3055. and like i said i would like to power a light bulb or something. i am using the digram you posted with the inductor you got from the tv. you dont think that transistor would handle 9v? what about 7.8v i have some lithium batteries that are 7.4 but charged fully go to 7.8v. and with my multimeter not having the correct fuse in it there is no way for me to read amps, i can volts, but most of the time its not 100% accurate.

so think of what i am doing. 10t 18g primary over 100t 26g pickup 2n3055 transistor and wanting to power a light bulb, hopefully a small appliance. such as a cell phone charger or something like that. i would think putting in 9v would get the output alot higher, and thought the transistor would handle 9v, since the bedini motor uses the same transistor, on 12v 3a power supply.
so what do you think i should do, or what will happen.

Offline TinselKoala

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13968
Re: New comer needs any and all help
« Reply #147 on: November 17, 2012, 04:08:16 AM »
Sure, use the 2n3055, and put a base resistor in there. The best would be to use the same variable resistor arrangement as for the Bedini motor. Or you could start with, say, 680R, 1/2 Watt, and see what happens. You can download a "data sheet" for your 2n3055 and see what the maximum permitted voltages between Base and Collector, Base and Emitter, and Emitter and Collector, and also the maximum allowed currents, and then choose your base resistor based on Ohm's law, your battery voltage, and the desired current from Base to Emitter.

You should be able to light up some bulbs with that, I'd think.


Meanwhile here are a couple pix of the Flyback driver board. I noted all the parts on there by their numbers on the schematic above; I hope this is helpful to you if you decide to build it.

Offline jhsmith87

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 82
Re: New comer needs any and all help
« Reply #148 on: November 17, 2012, 04:49:47 AM »
Yea the pics help a bit.. was that tiny black rod your coil?
But since I don't have the things needed to make that I'm building the diagram u posted before that one. Just differentcoil.
I'm still not done. I'm wondering what kinda volts I'll get set up like that with a 9v batt. I would like to see at least 24v

Offline TinselKoala

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 13968
Re: New comer needs any and all help
« Reply #149 on: November 17, 2012, 06:55:34 AM »
Well, if I can get 170 volts from a triple A.... you should be able to get 24 from a nine-volt. But power isn't just voltage, you need current too, and short spikes have the effect of lowering the average current.
What kind of bulb are you wanting to light? You will for sure be able to light a bunch of LEDs, probably even a CFL if you got the windings right.

I dunno which tiny black rod you mean. The black-coated coils on the top right are two 60 microHy chokes in series to make the 120 microHy L1. The flyback transformer and the 8 turn center tapped primary are out of the shot, to the left, but you can see the three-terminal block where the primary hooks to the driver board on the left.